Beating The Heat At Gwangalli Beach

What’s up y’all? Doing good? That’s great. Me? A little English tutoring, a little sight-seeing. I told you about my student, right? I’m teaching English to an ajumma (Korean for “middle-aged woman”. A post on ajummas later, I promise!). She is so sweet, and really grateful that I’m spending time with her every day. I’m just happy that I can show off how much Korean I know (though I do get the occasional blank look that tells me I said something really weird and undecipherable.) She even brings me snacks sometimes and we chat in Korean with two other ajummas who are also regular members.

When it comes to the other staff, we recently lost a few members (we’re all travelers, remember. People come and go often here) so it’s been really quiet and the energy in the cafe is just not the same. Hopefully we’ll get some more fun people soon. We miss you guys!

And finally, I know I’ve said it a bazillion times, but it’s hot here. So hot. And humid. Literally every day is like that face-melting scene from Raiders of the Lost Ark. And when it’s not hot and humid, it’s slightly less hot, raining and humid. Fun combo.

Despite the heat, I’ve still made it out and about this week. And although I’m not much of a shopper, I checked out some of the best shopping in Busan. The shopping scene here varies tremendously. First, you have shopping malls like Shinsegae (신세계 백화점), the largest department store in the world.

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Nine floors of shopping, eating and entertainment, including the famous SpaLand sauna and an indoor ice-skating rink. I was just at Shinsegae this weekend, but sadly I forgot my bundles of hundred-dollar bills so I wasn’t able to buy much.

Fortunately for those of you with skinny wallets, there are other options. Do you like haggling with old women over the price of kimchi?  Do you enjoy shopping for strange-looking vegetables out of the back of a rusty old truck? Do you prefer to choose your own sushi, still-wriggling, from a bucket of lively eels? Well then, Bujeon Market (부전 시장) is the place for you!

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I found myself here the other day pretty much by accident. There is a major subway station called Seomyeon (서면) where I’ve spent a lot of time underground while transferring between train lines, but I had never actually been above ground there, until last week. I stumbled across this very lively market. Okay, make that “village.” I’ve seen traditional markets like this in Korea before, but Bujeon takes up several blocks. It’s huge! And there was sooo much food. I know you might think there is a lot of produce at American grocery stores, but I wandered down a back alley behind some of the stalls and there were garages (that’s really the best way to describe the storage rooms) that were just PACKED with bags of onions or watermelons or cabbage or radishes or chili peppers. I’ve never seen anything like it. Unfortunately I didn’t get any pictures. There are a lot less foreigners in Busan than in Seoul, so I stand out even more here, and I definitely looked suspicious creeping around in the secret back-alleys of a Korean market. A lot of the stall owners gave me weird looks.

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Kimchis!

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Hmmm… all dressed up and nowhere to go… Maybe I’ll go gaze at some seafood…

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On my day off I decided I needed a break from talking to people all day (sorry, guys) so I hopped a train early in the morning and went out to Beomeosa Temple (범어사). I was a little bit skeptical at first because I’ve seen so many Buddhist temples since coming to Korea and I already saw the other famous Busan temple, Yongungsa, but I was glad I went. Beomeosa is bigger, more beautiful, and more impressive than Yonggungsa, and it’s up in the mountains so it was a little bit cooler up there and more quiet and peaceful. And definitely far from home. It took me two train lines, a bus-ride, and and hour and a half to get there.

The first people I saw when I got there were all dressed like this:

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I don’t know if you remember my post about climbing Bukhansan Mountain with my parents, but when we first arrived at the bottom of the mountain that day, everyone around us was dressed like that too: sturdy hiking shoes, fancy exercise clothes, climbing poles and gloves, backpacks full of kimbab… I’ll admit I had a slight panic moment when I got to Beomeosa. Was another “hike” going to turn in to a mountain climb?

Fortunately the temple itself was only a 5 minute walk from the bus stop. Whew! But those of you who like climbing, there are trails up the mountain. And several little hermitages that offer temple stays (for a hefty price, obviously.)

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The pathway to the temple was lined with these turtle monuments (see the turtle creature at the bottom?) I assumed they were some kind of grave markers. Commemorating really kick-ass Buddhist monks, perhaps?

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Please. Everyone knows the world rests on the back of a giant lion-turtle!

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Either a monument to a monk… or a gravestone from the Korean version of Oregon Trail. “Here lies Becky Sue. What a shame she caught cholera, was attacked by bandits, and eaten by a bear. Rest in peace.”

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This gate is supposedly a big deal because of the supports. There are four columns, instead of the usual two, and they are made of stone. Also, it’s very easy to walk around it, so not much of a gate, really.

The impressive thing about Beomeosa is that it’s really more of a temple compound, instead of a single temple. There were at least a dozen halls, and probably a lot more little prayer rooms that I didn’t see. The temples are still being used, so some areas were closed off to tourists. There were actually many people praying there when I was visiting. And I caught a glimpse of some airbenders… I mean, Buddhist monks.

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Many of the temple’s congregants were elderly. It doesn’t look like Buddhism is especially popular with the younger generations. Though it could just be that the remote location of Beomeosa and the super fashionable dress code (tunics and baggy grandma pants) dissuade a more “hip” crowd from attending.

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Ha ha! Sneak-attack photo! I like his shoes. Very traditional Korean.

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Just some mountains…

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These guys again. Someone has a thing for figurines.

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White Lotus???

And of course, no attraction in Korea is complete without a little Konglish. I walked through the wisteria gardens a little bit. They were nice enough, but gregarious? Not so sure.

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There are two famous beaches in Busan. The larger and more well-known is Haeundae (해운대, which I think I mentioned one or two posts ago), but my apartment is closer to Gwangalli Beach (광안리) which is a little less popular, but offers a great view of the Gwangalli Bridge. Also, there is a public walking path along the water from my neighborhood to the beach, so I’ve taken to jogging there in the evenings (the only time when it’s not so hot that you’re sweating buckets as soon as you walk out the door.) It’s really nice because the bridge is lit up at night, and the rest of Busan is out power-walking along with you.

I apologize for the crappy pictures, but hopefully you’ll get the idea.

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Pun time! (I told a bunch of these to one of our Korean roommates and we had some good laughs… though everyone else just looked a little confused. Their loss!)

What do you call a 5 year-old onion? 오년!

What did the bread say when it ran into a wall? 빵!

Until next time guys!

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